Genomic Landscape of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Unveiled in New Study

Analysis of Prostate Tumors Reveals Clues to Cancer’s Aggressiveness
Sequencing finds genetic errors common in metastatic tumors

PSA Rising August 4 2018. A comprehensive genetic analysis of metastatic prostate cancer has, for the first time, revealed a number of major ways in which abnormal alterations of the genome propel this aggressive form of the disease.

Using genetic sequencing, scientists revealed the complete DNA makeup of more than 100 aggressive prostate tumors, pinpointing important genetic errors these deadly tumors have in common. The multicenter study lays the foundation for finding new ways to treat prostate cancer, particularly for the most aggressive forms of the disease.

Genomic hallmarks of metastatic prostate cancer
Genomic Hallmarks and Structural Variation in Metastatic Prostate Cancer. Graphical Abstract, source: Cell

Continue reading “Genomic Landscape of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Unveiled in New Study”

New Treatment Option Available for Men Suffering from Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

A non-surgical solution for enlarged prostates, used in Europe, now FDA approved in USA

Physicians at UC San Diego Health are now offering prostate artery embolization (PAE) as a new treatment option for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or an enlarged prostate. The minimally invasive procedure is an alternative to surgery, with no hospital stay, little operative pain and lower cost.

“PAE has been available in Europe as a treatment option for an enlarged prostate for several years,” said Andrew Picel, MD, interventional radiologist at UC San Diego Health. “With the recent FDA approval of this procedure, we are happy to offer this as an alternative to surgery for patients who are good candidates.” Continue reading “New Treatment Option Available for Men Suffering from Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia”

RESPOND is the First Large-Scale Study on African-American Men with Prostate Cancer

August 3, PSA Rising. African American men are more likely to develop prostate cancer than men of any other race and the disease is often more aggressive when diagnosed.

Now, African American touched by prostate cancer are being asked to join an ambitious study to find out why African-American men are at higher risk for developing more aggressive forms of prostate cancer and why they are more likely to die from it.

African American prostate cancer patient-survivors invited to join RESPOND study.ivors invited to join RESPOND study
Facing prostate cancer together. African American prostate cancer patient-survivors invited to join nationwide RESPOND study. Photo source: newsroom: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Called RESPOND, this nationwide study aims to attract 10,000 African-American men  to participate. The $26.5 million effort will look at the role of social stressors and genetics in the development of prostate cancer in African-American men. Continue reading “RESPOND is the First Large-Scale Study on African-American Men with Prostate Cancer”

Palliative Care: Another Level of Support in the Cancer Journey

Palliative care supports well-being.Palliative care is appropriate at any stage of a cancer diagnosis and can be provided along with curative treatment

August 1, 2018 (Source, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey) When you or a loved one are diagnosed with cancer, it is normal to be overwhelmed by thoughts of prognosis, treatments, and potential complications. Patients wonder how their lives are going to change and whether their quality of life will ever return to normal. Pain and other symptoms, sometimes from the disease and sometimes from the treatments, can have a negative impact on one’s ability to maintain a satisfactory quality of life. Dealing with the diagnosis and learning how to live with cancer requires a team effort and support from a number of professionals.

Palliative care, sometimes referred to as supportive oncology services, is a specialized field of medicine focused on patients with serious illness. The goal is to help maximize quality of life through expert pain and symptom management, improved communication about goals of care and advance care planning, all while providing an extra layer of support while dealing with a serious illness. Ideally, the palliative care team works closely with the oncology team to help ensure that a patient’s quality of life is a focus as they and loved ones deal with all stages of cancer. Continue reading “Palliative Care: Another Level of Support in the Cancer Journey”

Microscopic Imaging Opens a Window Into Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

Researchers engineer a non-invasive model for monitoring tumor-bone dynamics and response to therapy

August 1, 2018   Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have engineered a system allowing microscopic monitoring and imaging of cancer that has spread to the bone in mice so they can better understand and develop treatment for bone metastasis in humans.

Microscopic imaging of prostate cancer in bone.
Left to right: 1) Dietmar Hutmacher, Ph.D., Centre in Regenerative Medicine, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. 2) First observation of cancer-induced bone loss by intravital microscopy shows surrounding bone cells in cyan; bone remodeling in white; bone destroying osteoclasts in yellow; and red and green for prostate cancer cell cytoplasm and nucleus.
3) Monitoring a bone lesion caused by prostate cancer metastasis at 3, 6, and 9 days after treatment with zoledronic acid. Images were superimposed to generate a map of bone destruction (osteolysis). The left side of the lesion is stable, the right side shows bone destruction.

“Advanced prostate cancer and other cancers metastasize to the bones, causing resistance to therapy and pain for patients, but it’s not really clear what makes the bone so special to prostate cancer progression,” said Eleonora Dondossola, Ph.D., instructor in Genitourinary Medical Oncology and lead author of a paper in Science Translational Medicine.

Eleonora Dondossola, Ph.D.
Eleonora Dondossola, Ph.D., instructor in Genitourinary Medical Oncology and lead author of a paper in Science Translational Medicine.

“Bone probably provides cues and an attractive microenvironment for cancer cells to grow,” Dr. Dondossola notes, but noninvasive microscopy to study the process in detail is hindered by the thickness of the outer bone blocking the view of inner cavity and bone marrow.

“It was a black box. Finally, our model allows us to get inside the bone with intravital multiphoton microscopy and shed some light on these phenomena,” she said. Continue reading “Microscopic Imaging Opens a Window Into Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis”