Minimally Invasive Radical Prostatectomy Shows Advantages, But Also Certain Complications

Shorter and Safer Hospital Stays But More Risk of Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction, Study Shows

New research indicates that the use of minimally invasive procedures (including the use of robotic assistance) for radical prostatectomy, which have increased significantly in recent years, may shorten hospital stays and decrease respiratory and surgical complications, but may also result in an increased rate of certain complications, including incontinence and erectile dysfunction, according to a study in the October 14 issue of JAMA

MRI: Effective Tool for Staging Prostate Cancer

In patients with prostate cancer undergoing prostatectomy, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can play an important role in determining if the cancer is restricted to the prostate gland or if it has spread beyond the capsule.

This is the finding of a study performed at the University of California, Los Angeles, CA. The study included a review of 119 patients who were referred for prostate MRI prior to prostatectomy.

“Results showed that MRI correctly identified 87 out of 92 (95%) of patients with T2 and 6 out of 8 (75%) of patients with T3 disease (T2 means the disease is organ confined and T3 means the disease has locally spread beyond the prostate),” said Timothy McClure, MD, lead author of the study. Steven Raman, MD, worked with Dr. McClure on this study.