Minimally Invasive Radical Prostatectomy Shows Advantages, But Also Certain Complications

Shorter and Safer Hospital Stays But More Risk of Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction, Study Shows

New research indicates that the use of minimally invasive procedures (including the use of robotic assistance) for radical prostatectomy, which have increased significantly in recent years, may shorten hospital stays and decrease respiratory and surgical complications, but may also result in an increased rate of certain complications, including incontinence and erectile dysfunction, according to a study in the October 14 issue of JAMA

Two Robots Better Than One for Prostate Surgery

Adding A Second Robot May Help Surgeon to Spare Nerves Controlling Erections

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a new technique that may improve robotic prostate surgery by using a second robot for taking three-dimensional ultrasound images of the prostate and surrounding structures during the procedure. These images can potentially help surgeons spot the nerve bundle that controls erectile function.